The Summer Speakers Series

Fourth Sundays of July, August & September 12:30-2:00

Weston United Methodist Church at Fellowship Hall
533 Main Street, Weston, MO, 64098

The Black Ancestors Awareness Campaign (BAAC) and the Weston United Methodist Church (WUMC) are excited to announce their second annual Summer Speakers Series, sponsored in part by the State Historical Society of Missouri and SalusPopuli.Org, featuring three distinct presentations of historical and cultural interest on the fourth Sundays during the summer. Coffee and ala-carte brunch items will be available for purchase from WUMC’s Back Door Coffee.

The Summer Speakers Series is a production of the Black Ancestors Awareness Campaign and Weston United Methodist Church. We unite communities through thoughtful programs featuring history, educational storytelling and interactive multi-media presentations.

Join us and feel free to wear your favorite cowboy attire!

When Spanish settlers arrived in New Spain – later Mexico and the American Southwest – they brought with them the tradition of the Vaquero, a horse-mounted livestock herder that originated on the Iberian Peninsula of Europe. As American settlers moved west, they adopted the methods of the Vaqueros for managing large herds of cattle. In the 1800s, demand for beef grew and the cattle industry boomed. Massive cattle-drives to railheads in towns like Sedalia, Missouri, Garden City, Dodge City, and Abilene required the unique skills of Hispanic, Black, American Indian, and white cowboys of the Vaquero tradition. Eventually, much of the meat processing to place in Kansas City, Kansas and the West Bottoms on the Missouri side of the State lines. This presentation highlights the culture of Vaquero, to include the development of the corrido, a form of ballad popular among cowboys.

When Spanish settlers arrived in New Spain – later Mexico and the American Southwest – they brought with them the tradition of the Vaquero, a horse-mounted livestock herder that originated on the Iberian Peninsula of Europe. As American settlers moved west, they adopted the methods of the Vaqueros for managing large herds of cattle. In the 1800s, demand for beef grew and the cattle industry boomed. Massive cattle-drives to railheads in towns like Sedalia, Missouri, Garden City, Dodge City, and Abilene required the unique skills of Hispanic, Black, American Indian, and white cowboys of the Vaquero tradition. Eventually, much of the meat processing to place in Kansas City, Kansas and the West Bottoms on the Missouri side of the State lines. This presentation highlights the culture of Vaquero, to include the development of the corrido, a form of ballad popular among cowboys.